civic media: week ten

youth activism

 

This week was especially inspiring in Civic Media, as we began to discuss topics surrounding youth activism and social change. Specifically, our discussions focused on the powerful roles that girls, teens, and women play in our society.

 

Our discussion began with the distinction between the Global North versus the Global South. Before my time at St. Joe’s, this is a topic that I had not frequently heard about or discussed. The Global North is defined as the more developed regions and areas of the world whereas the Global South includes those less developed regions.

 

In the Global South, girls are often utilized as labor by the North. As these girls do not have access to the same opportunities, they are often oppressed through capitalism and forced into labor. Women and young girls are often the majority of workers found in sweatshops, as their “nimble fingers” allude to their daintiness and assumes their passivity by the public. The system of labor that the female population faces in the Global South thus produces a cycle of poverty.

 

Conversely, girls are primarily valued as consumer citizens in the Global North. Above all else, girls are most often looked at as a segment of passive consumers. Rather than being portrayed with an interest in activism or global issues, girls in the North are most often viewed as having interests in consuming goods.

 

Despite the differences that girls face in the Global North versus the Global South, all women are called to become Global Citizens, namely, the idea that one’s identity transcends their geography or political borders. The responsibilities of all individuals can be defined in terms of a broader “humanity.” This is essential to constructing global narratives free of biases, and moving away from the danger of a single story.

 

Furthermore, it is evident that young girls throughout the world are becoming global citizens as they feel called to various activist issues. As girls are uniquely positioned agents of social activism and change, they have the power to create magnified results through their involvement with the community.

 

As a group, we researched the activism and work of Alexandra Scott, the leading figure behind Alex’s Lemonade Stand. After being diagnosed with neuroblastoma, Alex decided to have a lemonade stand in her front yard in order to raise money for the hospital and doctors where she was receiving treatment. At her first lemonade stand, Alex raised over $2,000 for her hospital. Alex and her family continued to have lemonade stands in their front yard, and word soon spread about Alex’s mission. People from all over the world began to have their own lemonade stands, donating the money to Alex and her cause. By the time of her death in 2004, Alex had raised over $1 million and inspired hope within the community to find a cure for cancer.

 

Through the young activism and hopeful spirit of girls throughout the world, such as Alex, the single narrative is being re-written. Girls are increasingly becoming global citizens, inspiring others through their stories and missions.

 

thanks for reading

– madauer

 

PS – check out my Fela Kuti Activism video here! It combines what I have learned about Fela as an activist and artist, as well as what I have learned about the power of change through artistic forms.

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